problems with lead toys

Lead toys were popular in the 1920s-30s. Makers such as Kansas Toy and Novelty, C.A. Woods made many different types of toys.

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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby grwebster » Thu Dec 31, 2009 7:11 am

barry, I'll do that during my next trip to the collection and take some pics to post.
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby grwebster » Sun Mar 21, 2010 1:40 pm

Deniis ramsey send me this artle
http://www.dt.navy.mil/cnsm/lead_01.html
the best one I have seen. Navy Museum and serious study conducted.
Here is my take.
Lead rot can be caused by wood and other surfaces which naturally secrete acetic acid. This reacts with lead to create the white dust which is identified as lead carbonate. "Models with lead parts should not be displayed or stored in cases made from oak or made from other woods on the highly destructive list. Woods not on the list in this report, and there are many, may range from minimally to highly harmful."
Best to leave lead objects exposed to air, not in a closed space- this explains why my box of lead planes that had one or two rot problems spread to most of the others. "World War Two vintage waterline identification models should not be stored closed within their original wooden carrying cases." So for those that collect the id ship models that come on wood plaques in a wood box, it might be best to take them out and off the boards, though mine seem to be fine after 60+ years in the boxes.

Lead carbonate which has accumulated should be removed from affected parts and from inside the exhibit case interior as frequently as possible.Brushing can do a good job. DO NOT use vinegre to clean as this contains +-5% acetic acid. Recommendation was to remove the dust physically and wash in water. Wear a face mask when handling and cleaning and after handling lead.

For models with lead parts, exhibit case interiors should be kept as cool as may be practical and keep moisture expose down.

Exhibit cases should exchange interior air about twice a day.

Wear a face mask when handling and cleaning and after handling lead.

dennis had another link
http://reviews.ebay.com/LEAD-ROT-IN-TOY ... LISTINGS:1
which was short and recommended the following:
"Use a soft brush cleaning the figure to remove the power and the affective parts and then treating with a solution of 50% pure gum spirits of turpentine and 50% medicinal mineral oil. The two are added together and shaken hard and applied with a swab.Badly affected pieces may be immersed in the solution to coat the insides of the hollow cast figures. Then they should be patted dry with a soft cloth then allowed to air dry for a least a week before putting them back in their boxes. This 50/50 solution of turpentine and mineral oil aids in the cleaning process,thins out the mineral oil for good penetration and surface coating. Depending when you start treating the lead rot you may have a section like on horses were it starts on the rear end and leaves holes just as rust on an old car."

I didn't see any reference to floor polish but it would seem logical. I will test this out next visit to the USA
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby kpmflyn » Sun May 15, 2011 3:05 am

I have only had problems with lead vehicles when they have been stored in closed or constricted environments. The oxidation process seems to be accelerated when exposed to certain fumes such as that given off by certain old enamels. Had a bunch of Comet vehicles that developed the problem after being displayed in a closed cabinet that had been painted on the interior with an old yellow enamel paint. A light rinse with white vinegar and a good rinse stopped the problem and it never occured again. But after that experience, I always had them displayed in an area with plenty of air circulation. Same thing occurs with the old lead dimestore soldiers. Never sealed them but I suppose a light liquid wax coating could do no harm.
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby angelreader » Sun May 15, 2011 11:55 am

A light mist of Duck oil will preserve lead models and stop the corrosion problem.
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby grwebster » Sun May 15, 2011 12:46 pm

What is Duck oil?
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby angelreader » Sun May 15, 2011 3:49 pm

GR it is a gentle light oil that leaves a trace film,that is the trade name,you probably have a similar product in France in the hardware stores ?
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby grwebster » Sun May 15, 2011 7:43 pm

I ran down the USA equivilent to Duck oil, its WD-40
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby angelreader » Sun May 15, 2011 9:04 pm

GR Duck oil is more gentle than WD40,I would not recommend using that as the distillents are more searching and vaporise quickly,Duck oil leaves a slightly oily residue that protects the surface for quite a while hence the name.
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Re: problems with lead toys

Postby voodoo1200 » Tue Sep 08, 2015 3:33 am

Has anyone tried coating their models with a layer of decal film......this would be the liquid in the bottles, modelers use when creating their own decals. Basically you print out your decals on decal paper then coat it with this decals film. I was thinking of ways to protect one of my panes, I bought an old Bronzart model and it was loosing paint in very small spots but lots of these little spots......not so bad that you even consider stripping and repainting but wanted to keep it from loosing any more. I had been making some custom decals and had a bottle of the decal film on my desk and thought "that should be perfect". It covered the plane with out any visible evidence. Now the plane and the paint has a air tight skin. My hope is that this will prevent any further decay of the plane and the paint.
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